A short guide on how to use 301 redirects to migrate your old website to a new site without losing traffic

What is a 301 redirect?

A 301 redirect is simply a code of date telling website spiders where you have moved your old web pages permanently to or where they can find similar information.  It may seem to be an irrelevant task for websites that have less than 10 pages, however, these lines of codes can make or break a site with thousands of pages migrating to a new design.

Why is a 301 necessary for site migration?

While information on the internet is movable and thus temporary, it is critical to make sure that information that you previously published is easily found by search engines especially if you have renamed the URL. Changing any url without proper redirection will render the current URL “dead” or 404 does not exist.

Losing old links to a 404 (not found page) code is like demolishing a well-established bridge to a town without giving commuters due notice or even alternative avenues to reach their destination.

While the main reasons why organisations often move to a new site are founded in the hope of creating growth in their market share, migration can instead be a reason for them to lose more traffic overnight. A brand’s following may not actually diminish but the number of visitors you get to your web pages through specific website signals can get disrupted as you change over to a new website.

Below are some technical tips on 301 redirections that can help you transition smoothly to a new website without losing relevant traffic:

Document your current site’s structure

Make sure to audit the structure of your site. Take note all your internal and external links before you move over. Use tools like screaming frog to get a comprehensive list of your existing pages, images and links as well as all the meta information of your pages.

Develop your new website structure

Once you have a comprehensive record of how your site is crawled by search engines, you will have 2 methods of structuring your new site.

Option 1 –  You can use the existing URIs as the basis of your current site structure and mirror the url structure on your new site.

This means that you need to keep your pages and URIs one is to one with no alterations to the way URLS are written. For example, if you have a “website.com/about-us”, your new page will be “website.com/about-us” not “website.com/about” or website.com/aboutus”.

Option 2 –  Use the current structure as a guide to match your new pages.

Most of the time, there is a necessity to alter the current URLS. This often happens if you want to alter the way information is ordered on your site or if you happen to have a new domain altogether. In this scenario, you will need to match the current urls with your new set of urls by using 301 redirections.

For example, if you have a blog entry about “how to buy cars” using a URL carscars.com/how-to-buy-cars, you will need to 301 redirect this page to your new url “carscars.com/a-guide-on-buying-cars” or to your new domain “carbuyer.com/how-to-buy-cars” otherwise your visitors will not be able to find the page with the old link.

Side notes:

  • Do not simply 301 redirect all pages to your new homepage.

It can be tempting to shortcut this step by redirecting old links to the new home page. It seems like an easy fix to do but doing this will make your site both confusing to the web spiders and, most importantly, frustrating to your users.

  • Match pages logically

If you do not have an apple to apples match of new pages with old pages, you can still 301 redirect pages to similar pages that may have the same kind of info as the previously existing page. However, accuracy in matching information is important. You do not want to send users and website spiders to page on shoes for men if your old was all about shoes for women.

  • Create a useful 404 page

Instead of just simply providing a generic notice use the opportunity to provide similar links or a search bar that they can use to find similar information on your site. Aim to create a 404 page that can turn a missing page into a user satisfaction opportunity.

Afterthoughts:

After you have implemented your 301 redirects on your new site, make sure to take note of 404 links through Google analytics and to re-crawl your site for 404 pages that may appear in the future. It will be guide practice to keep 404 pages to a minimum whether you are migrating to a new site or not.

More info on 301 redirects

https://yoast.com/create-301-redirect-wordpress/
https://www.bruceclay.com/blog/how-to-properly-implement-a-301-redirect/

More info on 404 pages

http://charlesriverinteractive.com/check-404-errors-right-way/

 

Your company website is more than just an online version of a company paper brochure. Its design and performance can be seen as a measure of your company’s values, efficiency  and services. A poorly-designed website will affect not only your reputation but can also affect your sales and revenue in the long run. One can say that your customers will judge your site as a reflection of how your business operates.

With the the popularity mobile devices and the exponential growth of online shopping, a fully-functioning optimised website is no longer just an option but a requirement. If you want to generate quality traffic  and to build customer loyalty for your site, avoid the 3 web design mistakes below:

Slow Loading Websites

slow-loading-websites

Users nowadays are generally impatient. A report showed that at least 25% of users ‘bounce’ or exit a site without doing anything if its pages load time exceeds 4 seconds. This lost audience can easily be translated as lost revenue. This is most evident in large ecommerce stores like Amazon where each second can be translated as billions of dollar in loss.  

Check the speed of your homepage and other most visited pages of your site. Any page that loads longer than 3 seconds need to optimised. Use tools like Google PageSpeed to find insights to speed up your website. Consider minimizing image sizes and making codes cleaner. You can also consider asking your host provider different solutions that they may have to improve your site’s load speed.  

 

Poor Mobile Site Experience

Poor Mobile Site Experiences

Nowadays, mobile devices are seemingly extensions of the people’s lives. Whether at work or in everyday lives, people have it with  all the time and everywhere. It is always within an arm’s length away from a person. Google recognized this behavior and updated its algorithm to award mobile-optimised sites with better search rankings in order to incentivize companies to make their sites mobile friendly.

Audit your site by browsing it with different mobile devices. Do different tasks like navigating to different pages, downloading items and signing up for newsletters. Take note of sections that made you pause or areas that did not function properly.

Check your site with Google’s Mobile-Friendly Test. This tool will show you how your site is displayed on different mobile browser sizes and orientations. It will also provide insight on areas of the mobile experience you can improve on.

 

No In-site Search Functionality

Website with no Search bar

Make it a point to provide easy access to your pages. People need information, and they need it quickly. What better way than providing them with an in-site search bar that allows them to input and browse your site’s page quickly. This is particularly important if you own a site that showcases thousands of different products.

Search functionality helps increase your site’s conversion. The data you will get from these searches will also help provide insight on items or pages that are important for them.

Have a search bar installed above the fold of each page of your website. Making sure this functionality is visible will directly affect both your bounce rate and conversion rate.

Summary

Website design can be quite difficult, but it can be beneficial if you know what to prioritize. Keep page load time fast, design for mobile and have a search function for your site. These basic items will keep your site competitive in the digital space.

When you have a business website and require changes to content like text, images, and links, how do you go about implementing those changes? Do you email your web admin and detail the changes to be made, or do you directly make the change yourself? If you’re the latter, then you probably have a content management tool built into your system. If you’re the former, then you are probably spending more time (and dollars) to manage your content.

 

Because time spent is measured in dollars, you as a business owner must aim for efficiency, innovation, and ROI.

 

How can you improve your profits if maintaining a website is still a considerable expense?

Let me give you an example.

 

I used to write blogs for a client for their business website – four articles a month spread out to one article each week. The scenario is that I write one article a week and email the article to the client. He will then review, make comments for improvement, or directly approve it. Once the content is approved, this will be forwarded to the web developer for posting on the site’s blog page. Then, the same routine follows for the next week’s blog.

 

The going back and forth each week with email communications and article reviews took a lot of time and energy. In an effort to make the process less time-consuming, I suggested to write the four articles a month in advance so it would be one sweeping process of writing, review, and publishing.

 

On average, this process takes about 3 to 4 days from start of content writing to getting the content published on the website.

 

But what if there’s another way?

 

I imagined being able to published directly on the website similar to a personal blog. In less than a day, an article can be written, reviewed, and published almost instantly, reducing time spent on processes, which can otherwise be spent on writing more content or other critical tasks.

 

That is what CMS is all about. Content Management System or CMS is a web application that you can install on your system to make it easy for you to add, edit, organize, and publish content on your website. If you are familiar with WordPress or other blogging platforms, you know you can log in, write content, add images, hit publish, and it is live on your website instantly.

 

In the earlier scenario, the alternative is that I have a login access to the client’s content management tool, I’ll input the content, upload images, and save it as draft. I can send quick email to the client that article is ready for review. He can then review the draft, even make edits, hit publish, and the article goes live. With CMS, it is also easy to schedule publication so you can set what date your article goes live, and it is queued in the system.